archive for the 'DIY' category

Garden Patterning Activity

Garden Patterning Activity

Pattern pins are versatile and easy to put together. They promote hands-on learning and quickly capture the attention of most learners.

I found this set of cute felt flowers and butterflies on Amazon and thought they were the perfect thing to use for our Garden Unit pins. For actual instructions on how to assemble the pins please refer to this post.

Garden Patterning Activity

When introducing the concept of patterning, emphasis that a pattern is only a pattern if it is repeated at least two times. Follow up by showing examples. Break your children up into small groups and have them practice copying and extending these patterns. Start with easier ones and work up to more complicated ones.

In conclusion, be sure to give each student the opportunity to “read” their patterns after they have been created.

MATERIALS USED:

– Paint mixing sticks
– Paint (craft or spray)
– Clothespins
– Felt flowers and butterflies
– Hot glue gun

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Christmas Patterning Activity

christmas patterning activity

This Christmas patterning activity is one of many pattern pin sets that we use in our classrooms. Pattern pins are easy to make, inexpensive, hands-on learning tools. Plus, they are super cute, the kids love them, and they work those small hand muscles!

MATERIALS USED:

– Paint mixing sticks
– Paint (craft or spray)
– Clothespins
– Jingle bells
– Christmas mini bows
– Hot glue gun

christmas patterning activity

For this set, we painted the mixing sticks brown; we always use a dark color for our bases, so that the patterns really stand out. You can pick up mixing sticks at Home Depot, Lowe’s, or your local paint store. We found jingle bells and mini Christmas bows at Dollar Tree, and hot glued them to the tops of clothespins.

christmas patterning activity

You might first introduce pattern pins and demonstrate the concept of patterning in a large group, and then work with small groups of children, making patterns together.

Students will not only create patterns, but they will also copy and extend patterns that are represented on other sticks (made by you or other students). For this reason, it’s a good idea to have multiple bases on hand. Be sure to encourage your students to identify their patterns and describe what is and what is not a pattern.

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Spooky Halloween Sensory Bin

spooky halloween sensory bin

This Halloween sensory bin is made of just a little bit of spooky and a whole lot of fun!

Children learn best by using their senses. Tubs filled with a variety of substances and materials enable young ones to use those senses to explore things that capture their attention. As they manipulate the objects, they are seeing, touching, smelling, and hearing. This allows them to collect information and make discoveries, which leads to the practice of many learning concepts.

spooky halloween sensory bin

Young learners build language, social emotional, and problem solving skills as they work alongside their peers to delve into the bin’s contents. They increase their math skills by counting, sorting, and classifying different elements. Quantity comparisons are also made as they decipher who has more “spiders” or “rocks” in their “cauldrons”. Additionally, scooping, pouring, and picking up different items helps to strengthen fine motor skills and eye-hand coordination.

Without a doubt, sensory bins are one of the best hands-on learning tools. So hurry and gather up a container and some spooky goodies!

MATERIALS USED:

– Any suitable container
– Aquarium gravel
Pom poms
Halloween buttons/embellishments
– Sequins
Mini candy cauldrons
Large googly eyes
Plastic spiders, bats, snakes, centipedes, skeletons
Halloween bouncy balls
– Plastic spoons

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