archive for the 'Sensory Porcessing' category

Easter Sensory Bin

Easter Sensory Bin

This Easter sensory bin assembly was completely effortless since we had so many cute goodies left over from our our 3D collage Hobby Lobby and Dollar Tree hauls. This time around, colored rock salt was used as a base. You can find the tutorial on how to color rock salt, rice, and macaroni in our post here.

Easter Sensory Bin

Oh, look who is making yet another appearance! We cannot get enough of the soft little chicks. The great thing is, is that even though this bin will contain many of the same items that the children will have used in their collages, they will be using them in totally different ways, creating new learning experiences.

Easter Sensory Bin

MATERIALS USED:

– Any suitable container
– A batch of colored rock salt (tutorial here)
– Plastic eggs
– Plastic bunny eggs
– Small glitter eggs
– Colored buttons
– Chicks
– Easter grass
– Small baskets
– Small cups
– Ice cream scoop
– Sand rake
– Tweezers

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Shaving Cream Easter Egg Craft

Finger painting with shaving cream allows children to explore, experiment, and create – all while strengthening their senses. Let’s finger paint some Easter eggs!

Shaving Cream Easter Egg Craft

Simply add a few drops of watercolor to the shaving cream, and blend. Give the children a large egg shape (download the free template here) or, depending on their age and ability, encourage them to cut out their own. Allow the kids to work the colors into the construction paper with their fingers.

What’s so great about this activity, is the way the shaving cream adheres to the paper. It goes on so lightly and dries almost instantaneously, yet it remains rich in color. The eggs don’t become soggy, making them prone to tearing or ripping like they normally would with regular paint or straight watercolor.

Shaving Cream Easter Egg Craft

Preschoolers may then glue (a dab will do ya) their eggs onto a bigger piece of construction paper. Add some Easter grass, and voila! This colorful finger painted egg is the perfect Easter decoration for any bulletin board or refrigerator.

MATERIALS USED:

– Construction paper
– Glue
– Our free printable egg template
– Scissors
– Easter grass
– Shaving cream
– Watercolors

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The Power of Playdough

The Power of Playdough

I thought it would be fun to set up a playdough bakery. I made some chocolate colored/scented dough and some lavender glitter dough. I also provided birthday candles, wooden flower decorations, colored beads (sprinkles), pie and bread tins, rolling pins, ice cream scoops, silicone cupcake holders, a serving platter with a doily, cookie cutters, etc.. I had everything ready to go before my class arrived.

The Power of Playdough

This is Chloe. She is always so serious and straight-faced in the mornings, so I was thrilled to see her chatting and smiling while making her “special star cookie”. Some of the kids made birthday cakes and cupcakes while singing “Happy Birthday” to each other.

The Power of Playdough

There are so many benefits to playing with this squishy substance.

SOCIAL EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Play dough allows preschoolers to come up with unique and creative ideas. Children often express pride in accomplishments when they use playdough in purposeful and meaningful ways. Social skills grow as they share space and materials.

FINE MOTOR SKILLS

Children use their hands and tools to pound, push, poke, shape, flatten, roll, cut, and scrape the dough. Through these experiences, they develop eye-hand coordination and control, dexterity, and strength; critical skills they will need later for writing, drawing, and other purposes.

The Power of Playdough

LANGUAGE/LITERACY

Working with playdough helps young children to enhance their language abilities. They practice listening, understanding, speaking, and communicating skills as they negotiate roles and engage in conversations with classmates and teachers. Materials like playdough encourage preschoolers to describe and reflect on what they are doing.

The Power of Playdough

SCIENCE AND MATH

As young children discuss what they are doing with the dough, they often engage in scientific thinking. They learn through tactile experiences, observing and reflecting on how materials feel and change (grainy, smooth, round, flat). Math skills increase as children compare shapes, measure sizes, and count.

All in all, NEVER underestimate the power of playdough.

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